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Every day brings us closer to finding a cure for cardiovascular disease - New Zealand's number one killer. Here is the latest from our research laboratories.
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Hypertension

Meet the team: Dr Melissa Farnham

Meet the team: Dr Melissa Farnham

Born and raised in Nevada, USA, Dr Melissa Farnham originally had no interest in research. Now Unit Leader of the High Blood Pressure Group at HRI, and balancing the challenges of family and work, she couldn’t imagine any other career path.

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New drug hope to target silent killer

New drug hope to target silent killer

An exciting new treatment for very high blood pressure is on the horizon after a world-first discovery by Heart Research Institute scientists, who have uncovered a brain chemical instrumental in triggering hypertension, the so-called silent killer responsible for the deaths of thousands of Australians each year.

The researchers are optimistic the results, published this week in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology, will ultimately lead to a powerful new treatment that blocks a neurotransmitter and frees patients from the dangers of hypertension. 

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Meet the team: Zohra Kakall

Meet the team: Zohra Kakall

PhD student Zohra Kakall has always been fascinated by whole body physiology and the integration between the brain and other bodily systems. This fascination drew her to the HRI High Blood Pressure Group - which focuses on the way that brain networks control airways, breathing and blood pressure - and led her on a research trip across Europe.

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World Hypertension Day

World Hypertension Day
Today is World Hypertension Day. Do you Know Your Numbers? Hypertension usually produces no symptoms which means most people don’t even realise they have it. It is estimated that roughly half of adults with hypertension are not aware of their condition.

 

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Epilepsy and the heart

While it is commonly known that epilepsy can cause loss of consciousness and disabling seizures, it is less well known that it can cause significant heart problems. A seizure can be potentially dangerous, triggering the nerves in the brainstem to increase blood pressure and heart rate and even cause dangerous heart rhythms.

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