Guacamole with Sesame Crisps

Recipe
Make your snacks count. Maximise your intake of heart-healthy nutrients like antioxidants and fibre by choosing fruit and vegetables as your first option. 

Ingredients

4 wholegrain wraps

1/2 tbsp olive oil

Rock or sea salt

Cumin spice

1/2 tbsp sesame seeds

1 large avocado, peeled and deseeded

2 tbsp fresh coriander leaves, finely chopped

1/4 clove garlic

1/2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

Method

1. Pre-heat oven to 180 degrees celsius. Line two baking trays with baking paper and set aside.

2. Brush each wrap with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, cumin and sesame seeds. Cut into eighths and place on the baking trays. Bake for 10-15 minutes until sesame seeds are slightly golden and the wrap is crispy.

3. While the chips are baking, place the avocado, coriander, garlic and lemon juice in a small food processor and process until smooth. 

4. Serve the guacamole with the chips. Dip and enjoy!

Recipe provided by nutritionist, Kate Freeman
KATE FREEMAN
Kate Freeman is a registered nutritionist and the creator and managing director The Healthy Eating Hub. Kate Freeman consults, writes, presents and mentors in the field of nutrition and has over 10 years of experience in the industry. 
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