Recipe: Saganaki Prawn Salad

Recipe
Supplied by Kate Freeman, Nutritionist assisting The Heart Research Institute 

We should all definitely eat more seafood other than fish. Prawns, muscles, scallops, etc. are all good for us. Prawns in particular are a very lean source of protein, and also a source of omega 3s, iron, iodine, zinc and B vitamins.

Here’s a great little recipe that’s really easy to prepare and also a great way to add vegetables to your diet. Enjoy!

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • small red onion, finely diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 600g green prawns, tails intact
  • 1 tbsp fresh oregano, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 punnet cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 120g feta cheese, crumbled
  • 4-6 cups of mixed salad greens
  • 1 yellow capsicum, thinly sliced
  • small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 8 slices sourdough bread

 

Method

1. Pre-heat an oven grill on medium-high heat 

2. Heat oil in a large oven-proof frying pan over medium-high heat. Add onion. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until softened. Add garlic. Cook for 1 minute or until fragrant.

3. Add prawns, oregano and half the parsley. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until prawns are pink and cooked through. Add tomatoes. Cook for 1 minute or until just starting to collapse.

4. Top with feta. Place under grill. Grill for 2 to 3 minutes or until feta is heated through. Sprinkle with remaining parsley.

5. Toss with salad greens, capsicum and onion. Serve with bread slices.

Note:     I've added wholemeal or high-fibre pasta to this recipe, which is also delicious. 

Nutrition Information

Energy: 2061kJ
Protein: 45g
Carbohydrate: 44g
Fat: 14g
Fibre: 5.5g
Sodium: 1272g

Health Tip

Choose a range of different vegetables to create colourful and vibrant meals. The different colours of each vegetable indicate a different spectrum of health-promoting compounds know as phytochemicals. Consuming plenty of vegetables each day and achieving a good variety is an important part of long-term heart health.

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